GJ

Coaches are leaders, and leaders build relationships. Theodore Roosevelt framed it up perfectly when he said;

People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.

From a coaching perspective, this means taking a genuine interest in your athlete’s lives outside of the gym. Great coaches have this relationship-building trait deep in their DNA. They engage in discussions of family, hobbies, unique skills, likes, dislikes, aspirations, and other non-training aspects about athlete’s lives. Then they actually listen to the responses – making their athletes feel uniquely valued. As a young coach, this concept was foreign to me until I met Greg Johnson. Greg was an Olympic Weightlifting teammate and fellow Strength and Conditioning coach. As a weightlifter, he brought an emotional shot of adrenaline to every training session. If he missed a lift on the platform, we all knew to duck our heads in fear of being pelted by flying weight belt. He coached with the same vigor, taking command of a room with his charisma. It didn’t hurt that he was 6’3” and 240 lbs.

The guy was all heart and your best friend within minutes of meeting him. For that reason, his athletes would have run through walls for him. Additionally, he was constantly being invited to (and attending) birthday parties of the young athletes he coached. This influence alone would go on to form my “Birthday Party” coaching philosophy (read more about it here). My most treasured coaching moments involve sharing the floor with Greg – a superhuman coach. Tragically, this week marked the 8 year anniversary of Greg’s death. A car accident may have prematurely ended Greg’s life, but his epic character lives on in the relationships I build with my athletes.

– Coach Hall

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